@2014-2018 Star And Seegull Alternatives Photography @ Chelsea Alessandra Photography - www.chelsealessandra.com
HOME READ ALOUD PROGRAM PUBLIC SERVICE VIDEO SERIES
The Home Read Aloud Program (HRAP) video series is available at no cost - via streaming video and on local Vermont community television stations - to young readers, their parents,  and their teachers. HRAP is comprised of six episodes of a complete reading of the children's novel, "Number The Stars" by Lois Lowry, and a brief introductory show. Each episode spans several chapters from the book as read by four elementary students grades four through six - to one of their parents who was seated at their side. The readings were filmed over the course of several weekends in the children's room of the Norwich (VT) Public Library. The student "Readers" did not rehearse; they merely read for a few minutes to a "Listener" as the cameras rolled. Of course, any person who reads aloud makes perceptible mistakes, and viewers may hear these students make errors, which they very often self-correct. In addition, viewers who read along with the Readers will discover other small errors now and then. And it's all good, as the saying goes. Because making mistakes is vital to learning, and feeling at ease enough to continue reading is what HRAP is about. As a matter of fact, viewers may be curious why the Listeners (their parents) did not correct the obvious mistakes of the Readers (the children). This is because the Listeners should not interrupt, correct, or offer help to the Readers at all, though they must always respond to a Reader's question or a "signal." The signal is how the Reader will ask for help in a non-verbal way, if they want, and it can be as simple as a tap on the page or a gentle nudge of the elbow. But, once again, it is up to the Reader to determine if they want help or not. Thus, what viewers of the HRAP videos will see - thanks to the hours of effort by these students and parents - is a model of how HRAP student-parent interaction should go. I hope parents and children try this technique at home, and it is further hoped that youngsters at home or in class - will read along with the Readers while watching these episodes, thus strengthening their reading skills. But HRAP is about more than improving reading skills. Yes, that is its stated purpose, but HRAP also builds student confidence in their own voice and sense of self, and helps build a stronger parent-child bond. The reasons for that have to do with the HRAP guidelines. The guidelines are just a mix of fairly standard techniques that have been used for generations. For starters, the length of the reading session must be comfortable at first, perhaps ten or twelve minutes for fourth graders, but increasing to fifteen or twenty minutes,four or five times a week, as the school year progresses. NEXT PAGE
@2014-2018 Star And Seegull Alternatives Photography @ Chelsea Alessandra Photography - www.chelsealessandra.com
Star And Seegull Alternatives
The Home Read Aloud Program (HRAP) video series is available at no cost - via streaming video and on local Vermont community television stations - to young readers, their parents,  and their teachers. HRAP is comprised of six episodes of a complete reading of the children's novel, "Number The Stars" by Lois Lowry, and a brief introductory show. Each episode spans several chapters from the book as read by four elementary students grades four through six - to one of their parents who was seated at their side. The readings were filmed over the course of several weekends in the children's room of the Norwich (VT) Public Library. The student "Readers" did not rehearse; they merely read for a few minutes to a "Listener" as the cameras rolled. Of course, any person who reads aloud makes perceptible mistakes, and viewers may hear these students make errors, which they very often self-correct. In addition, viewers who read along with the Readers will discover other small errors now and then. And it's all good, as the saying goes. Because making mistakes is vital to learning, and feeling at ease enough to continue reading is what HRAP is about. As a matter of fact, viewers may be curious why the Listeners (their parents) did not correct the obvious mistakes of the Readers (the children). This is because the Listeners should not interrupt, correct, or offer help to the Readers at all, though they must always respond to a Reader's question or a "signal." The signal is how the Reader will ask for help in a non-verbal way, if they want, and it can be as simple as a tap on the page or a gentle nudge of the elbow. But, once again, it is up to the Reader to determine if they want help or not. Thus, what viewers of the HRAP videos will see - thanks to the hours of effort by these students and parents - is a model of how HRAP student- parent interaction should go. I hope parents and children try this technique at home, and it is further hoped that youngsters at home or in class - will read along with the Readers while watching these episodes, thus strengthening their reading skills. But HRAP is about more than improving reading skills. Yes, that is its stated purpose, but HRAP also builds student confidence in their own voice and sense of self, and helps build a stronger parent-child bond. The reasons for that have to do with the HRAP guidelines. The guidelines are just a mix of fairly standard techniques that have been used for generations. For starters, the length of the reading session must be comfortable at first, perhaps ten or twelve minutes for fourth graders, but increasing to fifteen or twenty minutes,four or five times a week, as the school year progresses. NEXT PAGE