@2014-2018 Star And Seegull Alternatives Photography @ Chelsea Alessandra Photography - www.chelsealessandra.com
HOME READ ALOUD PROGRAM PUBLIC SERVICE VIDEO SERIES
The next class day during a transition, I visited each student's desk and scanned their journal for completeness. I noted the neatness, effort, and overall writing improvement. The students watched and hoped I would reward them with the much-coveted "pluses" that they knew accumulate and lead to good grades and (probably most importantly!) "tokens." (I used a reward-based behavior-modification classroom management program. Tokens could be used to purchase items like cookies, pencils, paperbacks, etc.) The students were quite motivated because they knew efforts to improve earned as much recognition as being smart. Though I preferred that the Listener be a parent, I was certainly flexible; I did not mandate this nor make it part of the journal assessment. On occasion, some parents would ask other adults - such as grandparents, aunts, and uncles, and even just an older sibling once in a while - to substitute for them. I certainly couldn't penalize my students for their parents' lack of availability (due to time obligations) or, unfortunately, their parents' lack of interest, so substitutions inevitably happened. (Unfortunately, the parent-child bond can't get stronger if the parent is not present.) A last note on this video series: this is not a dramatization. It is a multi-camera documentation of children reading that has been added images, transitions, and sound effects. Age-appropriate vocabulary words are also shown on the screen as they are spoken. These effects are subtle and meant to augment the children's voices. My hope is that young viewers will connect the words they hear with visuals or sounds, thus supporting the development of their language skills and their imaginations. The overall effect is soothing and slow, rather than loud, shocking, or full of quick cuts. I hope that appeals to some youngsters, and that they develop a love of reading after watching these four hard-working students (and their three parents) enjoying a wonderful story together. Frank D'Aprile, Producer and Teacher Star And Seegull Alternatives www.starandseegull.com stargull@sover.net PREVIOUS PAGE
@2014-2018 Star And Seegull Alternatives Photography @ Chelsea Alessandra Photography - www.chelsealessandra.com
Star And Seegull Alternatives
The next class day during a transition, I visited each student's desk and scanned their journal for completeness. I noted the neatness, effort, and overall writing improvement. The students watched and hoped I would reward them with the much-coveted "pluses" that they knew accumulate and lead to good grades and (probably most importantly!) "tokens." (I used a reward-based behavior-modification classroom management program. Tokens could be used to purchase items like cookies, pencils, paperbacks, etc.) The students were quite motivated because they knew efforts to improve earned as much recognition as being smart. Though I preferred that the Listener be a parent, I was certainly flexible; I did not mandate this nor make it part of the journal assessment. On occasion, some parents would ask other adults - such as grandparents, aunts, and uncles, and even just an older sibling once in a while - to substitute for them. I certainly couldn't penalize my students for their parents' lack of availability (due to time obligations) or, unfortunately, their parents' lack of interest, so substitutions inevitably happened. (Unfortunately, the parent-child bond can't get stronger if the parent is not present.) A last note on this video series: this is not a dramatization. It is a multi- camera documentation of children reading that has been added images, transitions, and sound effects. Age-appropriate vocabulary words are also shown on the screen as they are spoken. These effects are subtle and meant to augment the children's voices. My hope is that young viewers will connect the words they hear with visuals or sounds, thus supporting the development of their language skills and their imaginations. The overall effect is soothing and slow, rather than loud, shocking, or full of quick cuts. I hope that appeals to some youngsters, and that they develop a love of reading after watching these four hard-working students (and their three parents) enjoying a wonderful story together. Frank D'Aprile, Producer and Teacher Star And Seegull Alternatives www.starandseegull.com stargull@sover.net PREVIOUS PAGE